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Photo Gallery - Page 2

 

 

Bob Shidler's Planes

Great Planes Rapture
This is the Great Planes Rapture. It's very similar to the Super Sportster series of planes in appearance, construction and flight. This is the first plane I built and flew this year after a short (6 year) vacation from the hobby. I originally had an OS .40 in it but it quickly became apparent that this was just not enough. An OS .46 really woke it up. It will knife-edge all the way across the field and gain altitude while doing it.  Vertical flight appears to be limited only by my failing eye sight.  (Bob)

Giles Foamy

This is a Giles 202 profile foamy scratch-built using a store-bought kit as a pattern. It tipped the scales at a hefty 15 oz. ready to fly. I built it using Elmer's foam board found in the framing section of Micheals (thanks for the tip John Irwin) and an arrow shaft picked up in the Sporting Goods section of Wal-Mart. Along with a few odds and ends I had in the shop, I probably have a total of $12 in it (discounting motor, LiPo batteries and radio gear). After Dan Cramer dragged me (kicking and screaming) into the world of electrics, I just can't seem to get enough! I thought it would be a great way to combine my R/C hobby with my camping hobby as these little foam planes are easy to take along and require little field equipment.  (Bob)

Giles Foamy

Here's a shot of the Giles foamy during the test flights. It really doesn't fly like the typical foam plane (i.e. in a 3-D manner) but more like a pattern ship. These test flights proved their worth as I came away with

some valuable design enhancements. These include: Need to beef up the forward fuse section to add rigidity; Will add some landing gear to protect the prop (I originally left these off to save weight but it turns out the motor is more than adequate for it ... test flights were flown mostly at half-throttle); Will add some designs/marking to the wing to aid in orientation (I thought the grey on the top of the wing/stab would provide enough contrast from the white underside but with the light of the setting Sun, it was easy to get lost). On my next version (there will be many), I'll move the tail feather servos much further back to help in balancing.  (Bob)

Gentle Lady Glider

I took some liberties with (a.k.a. kit bashed) a Carl Goldberg Gentle Lady glider. The wings and tail feathers are built per the plans. The fuse is built with balsa and ply for the forward section and a golf club shaft in the rear. She's known as "The Lady Gets the Shaft" in my little circle of friends. I flew it in the SWIFT 2006 Closer fun fly and the 4th LINOMA Fun Fly for 2006 (my first ever competitions). These weren't the best days for a "floater" due to the wind but I was able to get a couple of respectable

flights. (Bob)

Bob's Piper Cherokee

This is a Piper Cherokee that I built a couple of years ago. It's never been flown ... in fact, it's never had a running engine in it so it doesn't have any residue at all. It's ready to accept an OS .46 (cowl will fit right nicely) and the firewall is drilled for an OS Aluminum engine mount. I put a servo hatch in each wing for dual-servo aileron control.  (Bob)

Top View Aileron servo detail Upper side view
Side detail Front view Wing tip detail
 

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